Category: Group Theory

Centralizer, Normalizer, and Center of the Dihedral Group $D_{8}$

Problem 53

Let $D_8$ be the dihedral group of order $8$.
Using the generators and relations, we have
\[D_{8}=\langle r,s \mid r^4=s^2=1, sr=r^{-1}s\rangle.\]

(a) Let $A$ be the subgroup of $D_8$ generated by $r$, that is, $A=\{1,r,r^2,r^3\}$.
Prove that the centralizer $C_{D_8}(A)=A$.

(b) Show that the normalizer $N_{D_8}(A)=D_8$.

(c) Show that the center $Z(D_8)=\langle r^2 \rangle=\{1,r^2\}$, the subgroup generated by $r^2$.


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Dihedral Group and Rotation of the Plane

Problem 52

Let $n$ be a positive integer. Let $D_{2n}$ be the dihedral group of order $2n$. Using the generators and the relations, the dihedral group $D_{2n}$ is given by
\[D_{2n}=\langle r,s \mid r^n=s^2=1, sr=r^{-1}s\rangle.\] Put $\theta=2 \pi/n$.


(a) Prove that the matrix $\begin{bmatrix}
\cos \theta & -\sin \theta\\
\sin \theta& \cos \theta
\end{bmatrix}$ is the matrix representation of the linear transformation $T$ which rotates the $x$-$y$ plane about the origin in a counterclockwise direction by $\theta$ radians.


(b) Let $\GL_2(\R)$ be the group of all $2 \times 2$ invertible matrices with real entries. Show that the map $\rho: D_{2n} \to \GL_2(\R)$ defined on the generators by
\[ \rho(r)=\begin{bmatrix}
\cos \theta & -\sin \theta\\
\sin \theta& \cos \theta
\end{bmatrix} \text{ and }
\rho(s)=\begin{bmatrix}
0 & 1\\
1& 0
\end{bmatrix}\] extends to a homomorphism of $D_{2n}$ into $\GL_2(\R)$.


(c) Determine whether the homomorphism $\rho$ in part (b) is injective and/or surjective.


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Basic Properties of Characteristic Groups

Problem 22

Definition (automorphism).

An isomorphism from a group $G$ to itself is called an automorphism of $G$.
The set of all automorphism is denoted by $\Aut(G)$.

Definition (characteristic subgroup).

A subgroup $H$ of a group $G$ is called characteristic in $G$ if for any $\phi \in \Aut(G)$, we have $\phi(H)=H$. In words, this means that each automorphism of $G$ maps $H$ to itself.

Prove the followings.

(a) If $H$ is characteristic in $G$, then $H$ is a normal subgroup of $G$.

(b) If $H$ is the unique subgroup of $G$ of a given order, then $H$ is characteristic in $G$.

(c) Suppose that a subgroup $K$ is characteristic in a group $H$ and $H$ is a normal subgroup of $G$. Then $K$ is a normal subgroup in $G$.

 

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