Tagged: algebraic multiplicity

Find All the Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors of the 6 by 6 Matrix

Problem 400

Find all the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the matrix
\[A=\begin{bmatrix}
10001 & 3 & 5 & 7 &9 & 11 \\
1 & 10003 & 5 & 7 & 9 & 11 \\
1 & 3 & 10005 & 7 & 9 & 11 \\
1 & 3 & 5 & 10007 & 9 & 11 \\
1 &3 & 5 & 7 & 10009 & 11 \\
1 &3 & 5 & 7 & 9 & 10011
\end{bmatrix}.\]

(MIT, Linear Algebra Homework Problem)
 

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Quiz 13 (Part 1) Diagonalize a Matrix

Problem 385

Let
\[A=\begin{bmatrix}
2 & -1 & -1 \\
-1 &2 &-1 \\
-1 & -1 & 2
\end{bmatrix}.\] Determine whether the matrix $A$ is diagonalizable. If it is diagonalizable, then diagonalize $A$.
That is, find a nonsingular matrix $A$ and a diagonal matrix $D$ such that $S^{-1}AS=D$.

 

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Determine Dimensions of Eigenspaces From Characteristic Polynomial of Diagonalizable Matrix

Problem 384

Let $A$ be an $n\times n$ matrix with the characteristic polynomial
\[p(t)=t^3(t-1)^2(t-2)^5(t+2)^4.\] Assume that the matrix $A$ is diagonalizable.

(a) Find the size of the matrix $A$.

(b) Find the dimension of the eigenspace $E_2$ corresponding to the eigenvalue $\lambda=2$.

(c) Find the nullity of $A$.

(The Ohio State University, Linear Algebra final exam problem)
 

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Eigenvalues and Algebraic/Geometric Multiplicities of Matrix $A+cI$

Problem 378

Let $A$ be an $n \times n$ matrix and let $c$ be a complex number.

(a) For each eigenvalue $\lambda$ of $A$, prove that $\lambda+c$ is an eigenvalue of the matrix $A+cI$, where $I$ is the identity matrix. What can you say about the eigenvectors corresponding to $\lambda+c$?

(b) Prove that the algebraic multiplicity of the eigenvalue $\lambda$ of $A$ is the same as the algebraic multiplicity of the eigenvalue $\lambda+c$ of $A+cI$ are equal.

(c) How about geometric multiplicities?

 

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Quiz 12. Find Eigenvalues and their Algebraic and Geometric Multiplicities

Problem 376

(a) Let
\[A=\begin{bmatrix}
0 & 0 & 0 & 0 \\
1 &1 & 1 & 1 \\
0 & 0 & 0 & 0 \\
1 & 1 & 1 & 1
\end{bmatrix}.\] Find the eigenvalues of the matrix $A$. Also give the algebraic multiplicity of each eigenvalue.

(b) Let
\[A=\begin{bmatrix}
0 & 0 & 0 & 0 \\
1 &1 & 1 & 1 \\
0 & 0 & 0 & 0 \\
1 & 1 & 1 & 1
\end{bmatrix}.\] One of the eigenvalues of the matrix $A$ is $\lambda=0$. Find the geometric multiplicity of the eigenvalue $\lambda=0$.

 

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Determine a Matrix From Its Eigenvalue

Problem 259

Let
\[A=\begin{bmatrix}
a & -1\\
1& 4
\end{bmatrix}\] be a $2\times 2$ matrix, where $a$ is some real number.
Suppose that the matrix $A$ has an eigenvalue $3$.

(a) Determine the value of $a$.

(b) Does the matrix $A$ have eigenvalues other than $3$?

 

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Given Graphs of Characteristic Polynomial of Diagonalizable Matrices, Determine the Rank of Matrices

Problem 217

Let $A, B, C$ are $2\times 2$ diagonalizable matrices.

The graphs of characteristic polynomials of $A, B, C$ are shown below. The red graph is for $A$, blue one for $B$, and green one for $C$.

From this information, determine the rank of the matrices $A, B,$ and $C$.

Graphs of characteristic polynomials

Graphs of characteristic polynomials

 

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Two Matrices with the Same Characteristic Polynomial. Diagonalize if Possible.

Problem 216

Let
\[A=\begin{bmatrix}
1 & 3 & 3 \\
-3 &-5 &-3 \\
3 & 3 & 1
\end{bmatrix} \text{ and } B=\begin{bmatrix}
2 & 4 & 3 \\
-4 &-6 &-3 \\
3 & 3 & 1
\end{bmatrix}.\] For this problem, you may use the fact that both matrices have the same characteristic polynomial:
\[p_A(\lambda)=p_B(\lambda)=-(\lambda-1)(\lambda+2)^2.\]

(a) Find all eigenvectors of $A$.

(b) Find all eigenvectors of $B$.

(c) Which matrix $A$ or $B$ is diagonalizable?

(d) Diagonalize the matrix stated in (d), i.e., find an invertible matrix $P$ and a diagonal matrix $D$ such that $A=PDP^{-1}$ or $B=PDP^{-1}$.

(Stanford University Linear Algebra Final Exam Problem)
 

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How to Diagonalize a Matrix. Step by Step Explanation.

Problem 211

In this post, we explain how to diagonalize a matrix if it is diagonalizable.

As an example, we solve the following problem.

Diagonalize the matrix
\[A=\begin{bmatrix}
4 & -3 & -3 \\
3 &-2 &-3 \\
-1 & 1 & 2
\end{bmatrix}\] by finding a nonsingular matrix $S$ and a diagonal matrix $D$ such that $S^{-1}AS=D$.

(Update 10/15/2017. A new example problem was added.)

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Maximize the Dimension of the Null Space of $A-aI$

Problem 200

Let
\[ A=\begin{bmatrix}
5 & 2 & -1 \\
2 &2 &2 \\
-1 & 2 & 5
\end{bmatrix}.\]

Pick your favorite number $a$. Find the dimension of the null space of the matrix $A-aI$, where $I$ is the $3\times 3$ identity matrix.

Your score of this problem is equal to that dimension times five.

(The Ohio State University Linear Algebra Practice Problem)
 

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Determine Eigenvalues, Eigenvectors, Diagonalizable From a Partial Information of a Matrix

Problem 180

Suppose the following information is known about a $3\times 3$ matrix $A$.
\[A\begin{bmatrix}
1 \\
2 \\
1
\end{bmatrix}=6\begin{bmatrix}
1 \\
2 \\
1
\end{bmatrix},
\quad
A\begin{bmatrix}
1 \\
-1 \\
1
\end{bmatrix}=3\begin{bmatrix}
1 \\
-1 \\
1
\end{bmatrix}, \quad
A\begin{bmatrix}
2 \\
-1 \\
0
\end{bmatrix}=3\begin{bmatrix}
1 \\
-1 \\
1
\end{bmatrix}.\]

(a) Find the eigenvalues of $A$.

(b) Find the corresponding eigenspaces.

(c) In each of the following questions, you must give a correct reason (based on the theory of eigenvalues and eigenvectors) to get full credit.
Is $A$ a diagonalizable matrix?
Is $A$ an invertible matrix?
Is $A$ an idempotent matrix?

(Johns Hopkins University Linear Algebra Exam)
 

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All the Eigenvectors of a Matrix Are Eigenvectors of Another Matrix

Problem 51

Let $A$ and $B$ be an $n \times n$ matrices.
Suppose that all the eigenvalues of $A$ are distinct and the matrices $A$ and $B$ commute, that is $AB=BA$.

Then prove that each eigenvector of $A$ is an eigenvector of $B$.

(It could be that each eigenvector is an eigenvector for distinct eigenvalues.)


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