Category: Linear Algebra

A Matrix Equation of a Symmetric Matrix and the Limit of its Solution

Problem 457

Let $A$ be a real symmetric $n\times n$ matrix with $0$ as a simple eigenvalue (that is, the algebraic multiplicity of the eigenvalue $0$ is $1$), and let us fix a vector $\mathbf{v}\in \R^n$.

(a) Prove that for sufficiently small positive real $\epsilon$, the equation
\[A\mathbf{x}+\epsilon\mathbf{x}=\mathbf{v}\] has a unique solution $\mathbf{x}=\mathbf{x}(\epsilon) \in \R^n$.

(b) Evaluate
\[\lim_{\epsilon \to 0^+} \epsilon \mathbf{x}(\epsilon)\] in terms of $\mathbf{v}$, the eigenvectors of $A$, and the inner product $\langle\, ,\,\rangle$ on $\R^n$.

 
(University of California, Berkeley, Linear Algebra Qualifying Exam)

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Differentiating Linear Transformation is Nilpotent

Problem 453

Let $P_n$ be the vector space of all polynomials with real coefficients of degree $n$ or less.
Consider the differentiation linear transformation $T: P_n\to P_n$ defined by
\[T\left(\, f(x) \,\right)=\frac{d}{dx}f(x).\]

(a) Consider the case $n=2$. Let $B=\{1, x, x^2\}$ be a basis of $P_2$. Find the matrix representation $A$ of the linear transformation $T$ with respect to the basis $B$.

(b) Compute $A^3$, where $A$ is the matrix obtained in part (a).

(c) If you computed $A^3$ in part (b) directly, then is there any theoretical explanation of your result?

(d) Now we consider the general case. Let $B$ be any basis of the vector space of $P_n$ and let $A$ be the matrix representation of the linear transformation $T$ with respect to the basis $B$.
Prove that without any calculation that the matrix $A$ is nilpotent.

 
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Eigenvalues of Similarity Transformations

Problem 452

Let $A$ be an $n\times n$ complex matrix.
Let $S$ be an invertible matrix.

(a) If $SAS^{-1}=\lambda A$ for some complex number $\lambda$, then prove that either $\lambda^n=1$ or $A$ is a singular matrix.

(b) If $n$ is odd and $SAS^{-1}=-A$, then prove that $0$ is an eigenvalue of $A$.

(c) Suppose that all the eigenvalues of $A$ are integers and $\det(A) > 0$. If $n$ is odd and $SAS^{-1}=A^{-1}$, then prove that $1$ is an eigenvalue of $A$.

 
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Null Space, Nullity, Range, Rank of a Projection Linear Transformation

Problem 450

Let $\mathbf{u}=\begin{bmatrix}
1 \\
1 \\
0
\end{bmatrix}$ and $T:\R^3 \to \R^3$ be the linear transformation
\[T(\mathbf{x})=\proj_{\mathbf{u}}\mathbf{x}=\left(\, \frac{\mathbf{u}\cdot \mathbf{x}}{\mathbf{u}\cdot \mathbf{u}} \,\right)\mathbf{u}.\]

(a) Calculate the null space $\calN(T)$, a basis for $\calN(T)$ and nullity of $T$.

(b) Only by using part (a) and no other calculations, find $\det(A)$, where $A$ is the matrix representation of $T$ with respect to the standard basis of $\R^3$.

(c) Calculate the range $\calR(T)$, a basis for $\calR(T)$ and the rank of $T$.

(d) Calculate the matrix $A$ representing $T$ with respect to the standard basis for $\R^3$.

(e) Let
\[B=\left\{\, \begin{bmatrix}
1 \\
0 \\
0
\end{bmatrix}, \begin{bmatrix}
-1 \\
1 \\
0
\end{bmatrix}, \begin{bmatrix}
0 \\
-1 \\
1
\end{bmatrix} \,\right\}\] be a basis for $\R^3$.
Calculate the coordinates of $\begin{bmatrix}
x \\
y \\
z
\end{bmatrix}$ with respect to $B$.

(The Ohio State University, Linear Algebra Exam Problem)

 
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Solve the System of Linear Equations Using the Inverse Matrix of the Coefficient Matrix

Problem 442

Consider the following system of linear equations
\begin{align*}
2x+3y+z&=-1\\
3x+3y+z&=1\\
2x+4y+z&=-2.
\end{align*}

(a) Find the coefficient matrix $A$ for this system.

(b) Find the inverse matrix of the coefficient matrix found in (a)

(c) Solve the system using the inverse matrix $A^{-1}$.

 
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True of False Problems on Determinants and Invertible Matrices

Problem 438

Determine whether each of the following statements is True or False.

(a) If $A$ and $B$ are $n \times n$ matrices, and $P$ is an invertible $n \times n$ matrix such that $A=PBP^{-1}$, then $\det(A)=\det(B)$.

(b) If the characteristic polynomial of an $n \times n$ matrix $A$ is
\[p(\lambda)=(\lambda-1)^n+2,\] then $A$ is invertible.

(c) If $A^2$ is an invertible $n\times n$ matrix, then $A^3$ is also invertible.

(d) If $A$ is a $3\times 3$ matrix such that $\det(A)=7$, then $\det(2A^{\trans}A^{-1})=2$.

(e) If $\mathbf{v}$ is an eigenvector of an $n \times n$ matrix $A$ with corresponding eigenvalue $\lambda_1$, and if $\mathbf{w}$ is an eigenvector of $A$ with corresponding eigenvalue $\lambda_2$, then $\mathbf{v}+\mathbf{w}$ is an eigenvector of $A$ with corresponding eigenvalue $\lambda_1+\lambda_2$.

(Stanford University, Linear Algebra Exam Problem)
 
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Subspace Spanned By Cosine and Sine Functions

Problem 435

Let $\calF[0, 2\pi]$ be the vector space of all real valued functions defined on the interval $[0, 2\pi]$.
Define the map $f:\R^2 \to \calF[0, 2\pi]$ by
\[\left(\, f\left(\, \begin{bmatrix}
\alpha \\
\beta
\end{bmatrix} \,\right) \,\right)(x):=\alpha \cos x + \beta \sin x.\] We put
\[V:=\im f=\{\alpha \cos x + \beta \sin x \in \calF[0, 2\pi] \mid \alpha, \beta \in \R\}.\]

(a) Prove that the map $f$ is a linear transformation.

(b) Prove that the set $\{\cos x, \sin x\}$ is a basis of the vector space $V$.

(c) Prove that the kernel is trivial, that is, $\ker f=\{\mathbf{0}\}$.
(This yields an isomorphism of $\R^2$ and $V$.)

(d) Define a map $g:V \to V$ by
\[g(\alpha \cos x + \beta \sin x):=\frac{d}{dx}(\alpha \cos x+ \beta \sin x)=\beta \cos x -\alpha \sin x.\] Prove that the map $g$ is a linear transformation.

(e) Find the matrix representation of the linear transformation $g$ with respect to the basis $\{\cos x, \sin x\}$.

(Kyoto University, Linear Algebra exam problem)

 
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Differentiation is a Linear Transformation

Problem 433

Let $P_3$ be the vector space of polynomials of degree $3$ or less with real coefficients.

(a) Prove that the differentiation is a linear transformation. That is, prove that the map $T:P_3 \to P_3$ defined by
\[T\left(\, f(x) \,\right)=\frac{d}{dx} f(x)\] for any $f(x)\in P_3$ is a linear transformation.

(b) Let $B=\{1, x, x^2, x^3\}$ be a basis of $P_3$. With respect to the basis $B$, find the matrix representation of the linear transformation $T$ in part (a).

 
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Restriction of a Linear Transformation on the x-z Plane is a Linear Transformation

Problem 428

Let $T:\R^3 \to \R^3$ be a linear transformation and suppose that its matrix representation with respect to the standard basis is given by the matrix
\[A=\begin{bmatrix}
1 & 0 & 2 \\
0 &3 &0 \\
4 & 0 & 5
\end{bmatrix}.\]

(a) Prove that the linear transformation $T$ sends points on the $x$-$z$ plane to points on the $x$-$z$ plane.

(b) Prove that the restriction of $T$ on the $x$-$z$ plane is a linear transformation.

(c) Find the matrix representation of the linear transformation obtained in part (b) with respect to the standard basis
\[\left\{\, \begin{bmatrix}
1 \\
0 \\
0
\end{bmatrix}, \begin{bmatrix}
0 \\
0 \\
1
\end{bmatrix} \,\right\}\] of the $x$-$z$ plane.

 
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If $A$ is an Idempotent Matrix, then When $I-kA$ is an Idempotent Matrix?

Problem 426

A square matrix $A$ is called idempotent if $A^2=A$.

(a) Suppose $A$ is an $n \times n$ idempotent matrix and let $I$ be the $n\times n$ identity matrix. Prove that the matrix $I-A$ is an idempotent matrix.

(b) Assume that $A$ is an $n\times n$ nonzero idempotent matrix. Then determine all integers $k$ such that the matrix $I-kA$ is idempotent.

(c) Let $A$ and $B$ be $n\times n$ matrices satisfying
\[AB=A \text{ and } BA=B.\] Then prove that $A$ is an idempotent matrix.

 
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